Ethical Crisis Leadership | How to lead in midst of crisis and change

We have to recognize and understand that we are in a global crisis, which cannot go ignored. In everything we do, we are being affected.

As a leader, I have not exactly been in a situation like this and have been taking it day by day. I am having to learn how to problem solve in new ways for our collective and be a bit more proactive than normal, trying my best to project and anticipate our next move. One of my priorities is to ensure the safety of our artisans and staff and on the other hand, I have to consider how to keep our collective above water, so when our doors reopen, well, they can reopen. With uncertain revenue streams in the coming months, it makes a lot of uncontrollable arise and I have to ensure we are making wise as well as creative/innovative decisions in the next coming weeks.

All that to say, it has tested a new strand of leadership for me.

Ethical Crisis Leadership.
With my academic background in leadership development and communication, I tend to live and breathe all things leadership. I have spent the last decade studying ethical leadership, transformational leadership, servant leadership, adaptive leadership and many more, but I have never encountered a leadership that is completely transformed by a crisis.

As soon as COVID-19 entered our world, I started grabbing resources and reading about crisis management, ethical leadership (redefined), and leading in a culture of change.

I wanted to understand what it was going to take to be even more resilient, evoke confidence in our team, and continue to run our collective with our highest standards even in the midst of this pandemic. This could easily turn into a research analysis, which is not my intention for this blog and for you to endure…

(note: unless, you love research then give me a call and I can chat your ear off for hours! Perfect time to spend quarantining – geeking out over theories while sipping fresh coffee)

What I do want to leave you with in this blog is a bit of advice on how to effectively lead a team during a culture of change and crisis.

Understand that in a crisis, there are three stages and throughout each stage, you have to show up fully. As the leader, you have moral obligations to carry out and you want to ensure that you continue to lead a healthy organization or team through this. The three stages of a crisis are: pre-crisis, crisis event, and post-crisis.

Pre-crisis:
This is normally the longest stage in any crisis and many times, leaders get overly confident that they have all the solutions. This is where we need to be careful and not grow complacent or allow any human biases (decision making or judgement) to hinder our critical thinking processes.

In this time, ethical leaders show up big. They normally help detect the crisis, identify pain points and continually develop strategies. They are constantly learning, growing and looking for long term solutions rather than just the short term. They are identifying trends and trying to stay ahead of the curve, while leading their team with the right information. Most of the time, a crisis management plan is put into place and through this planning it allows for the leader to keep moral principles aligned as they plan during a new territorial time.

Crisis Event:
This is where ethical leaders are the most involved and active. They are leading in a crisis and the reality is focusing on damage control and the immediate threats that are affecting the individuals and/or organization around them. This is where the crisis management plan is put into place, but it is also a time where the leader is giving accurate information to those around them. During a crisis, there is a lot of misinformation and false news that circulates, so it is of utmost importance for the ethical leader to be transparent, sharing the most appropriate and true information to date. This is a time for the leader to shed light on the situation, enact a plan and calm fears through proper solutions. Take deep breathes and take it day by day as this stage can also be the most physically and mentally exhausting.

Post-Crisis:
This is a time of reflection and regrouping. As an ethical leader, it is a time to reflect on what was done right, make notes of what can be changed in the future, but more importantly to be there for your people. It is a time for healing to take place and as leaders, a time to listen and be there for your direct community. This stage is a time to renew focus and replace negative emotions of stress and anxiety with positive ones. Ethical leaders pay attention to details and shape memories around a crisis to honor those around them, while finding ways to heal and take steps forward.

Overall, understand that through these three stages, as leaders we have to be adaptive, flexible and show up BIG in ethical crisis leadership. Here are my 3 practical tips for you to be able to work through these phases:

1. Understand the Change
In everything, understand the change going on around you. Try not to be negatively affected by media, but have your facts correct. People are looking to you for answers and what the next step will be, so you want to be giving the most accurate and up to date information to your people. Stay in tune, so you are able to communicate the changed vision and empower those around you during a time of uncertainty.

2. Moral Purpose
Keep integrity. Through it all, being an ethical crisis leader is challenging and comes with its own stresses, but this is a time to shine. Allow your moral compass to never change. Be a moral agent for your community and help others overcome opposition through your positive character and courage. It is a time to show up and be the moral motivation that everyone needs during a time like this.

3. Be Sensitive
Everyone is affected differently in a crisis, so be an active listener, change perspectives by putting yourself in their shoes and practice humility. This is a time to reflect servant leadership and be there for your community in a new way. In all the phases, know people are looking up to you and it is our time to show a more sensitive side to our leadership, if you do not already.

You got this friend. Stay strong, true and be the ethical crisis leader you were meant to be.
We are in this together, always.

From one leader to another,

Social Consumerism driving Community Development

As our society becomes more conscious on their purchases it is creating a ripple effect of change across the globe. This trend or new direction of purchasing may be driven by the desires of the consumer and making their livelihood more clean, organic or do good, but the reality of the purchase is so much more.

When someone engages in being intentional with their purchases especially within international social enterprises then the consumer has automatically transformed into a change maker. A purchase among social enterprises is life giving and it helps develop communities and further poverty alleviation for generations.

My challenge for you today is to think local, small, ethical, fair trade, natural, organic and social impact. Start to ask yourself the hard questions. Begin to look at the tags of your products and research the wages of the county your garment or accessory was made from. Challenge the status quo and swim against the tide.

I live and breathe in the ethical space, but if you are not inundated and this all seems new to you, my biggest hope is that you would learn and equip yourself to teach the community around you.

This is bigger than yourself and your purchases are not just offering fair and steady employment, but through many of the social enterprises’ holistic programs, these companies are creating life altering change.

Be a part of the movement.

 

Here are some of my favorite ethically conscious brands that I love and adore:

Imani Collective (duh!)
Handspun Hope
Sseko Designs
UNCVRD Jewelry
YOUME Clothing
Noonday Clothing
Tenfold Collective
Abeba Collective
Elizabeth’s Voice
Known Supply
Flourish Market
Dreamer & Co.
Jimani Collections
Akola
Béljoy Jewelry
Purpose Jewelry
The Giving Keys
Able

From one social consumer to another – let us be change makers,